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Author Topic: Valve Lash Adjustment For 60 Degree V6  (Read 857 times)

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Fierofool

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Valve Lash Adjustment For 60 Degree V6
« on: March 28, 2015, 01:05:16 PM »
Fiero Valve Lash Adjustment Procedure For 2.8, 3.1, and 3.4
60 Degree V6

This procedure is valid if you have had to remove the heads or disturb the valve adjustment in any way.  If you are only replacing the lower intake gaskets, go to the Members Only Tool Shed and borrow the pushrod removal tool or purchase one at your auto parts store that carries Lisle Tools.  http://www.lislecorp.com/divisions/products/?product=298

With your fingers on the rocker arms of #1 cylinder, rotate engine clockwise until the crankshaft damper mark lines up with the 0 mark.  If there is no movement in the rocker arms as the timing mark approaches 0 then you are on # 1.  If they move, you are on # 4.  Anytime you pass the TDC mark, it’s best to continue rotating clockwise until you come back to TDC of the cylinder sequence you’re working with.  Timing component wear can give a false setting when you back up to the timing mark. 

To set the proper lash on each cylinder, loosen all the rocker arm adjusting nuts. 
As you follow the adjusting sequence below, rotate the pushrod while tightening the rocker arm nut until the moment you feel resistance in the pushrod.
Tighten the pushrod nut 1 ½ rotations after you feel the first resistance. 

If you start with # 1 cylinder at TDC, the sequence for adjusting are as follows:

Intake Valves 1, 5, and 6.
Exhaust Valves 1, 2, and 3.

Now, rotate the crankshaft in a clockwise direction 360 degrees until the crankshaft pulley timing mark comes to the 0 mark again.  This will be cylinder # 4 TDC.
Sequence for adjusting are as follows:

Intake Valves 2, 3, and 4.
Exhaust Valves 4, 5, and 6.

If you started with # 4 TDC sequence, adjust then rotate 360 degrees and adjust at # 1 TDC. 

Fierofool
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« Last Edit: April 06, 2015, 12:10:13 PM by Fierofool »
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Raydar

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Re: Valve Lash Adjustment For 60 Degree V6
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2015, 03:22:08 PM »
Everything that I've ever read tells you to spin the pushrod. I have found that that's not always reliable. It's quite easy to spin the pushrod, even when the slack has been removed. Especially if the lifters are not pumped up.
Instead, I rattle the pushrod around. When the clearance has been taken up, it will stop rattling. (You will still be able to spin it, however.)
Once it quits rattling, I then tighten the rocker the suggested amount.

Not that there's any problem with the other method. I just can't detect the subtle difference when the slack is gone. (Yes. I'm told that I'm "unfeeling"... But that's a whole 'nother topic.)

As always, YMMV.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2015, 03:24:45 PM by Raydar »
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GTRS Fiero

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Re: Valve Lash Adjustment For 60 Degree V6
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2018, 06:05:25 PM »
Hmmm.  We did them sequentially, by cylinder.  So, both exhaust and intake.  First one, then the other, moving from one cylinder to another.  Apparently, the book value for tightening the valves is one turn too many.

Fierofool

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Re: Valve Lash Adjustment For 60 Degree V6
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2018, 07:02:37 PM »
You can do them sequentially.  You just have to rotate the engine more times and verify tdc on each.
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GTRS Fiero

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Re: Valve Lash Adjustment For 60 Degree V6
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2018, 07:37:17 PM »
We used a tool that was attached to the starter.  When the trigger was squeezed, the starter would turn the motor.  This could be repeated until the proper position was achieved.